Fraser River - The main transportation hub

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stuffradio
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Fraser River - The main transportation hub

Postby stuffradio » Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:56 am

I posted this in the December forum, but this is a better avenue for it. The might fraser was the main transportation hub back in the day. Quite an interesting read, especially when it mentions a 40 degree drop in one day!

http://www.mapleridgenews.com/community/242450001.html

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Glacier
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Re: Fraser River - The main transportation hub

Postby Glacier » Thu Dec 08, 2016 11:49 am

I would agree that winters were colder 120 years ago than they are today, but I've never found any evidence of 40 degree swings in the Lower Mainland. I can look at the historical data, and I swings of about 10C on a good day, just as you find today.

40F is 22C, and that has never happened. Looking at data from 1899 shows nothing out of the ordinary in terms of daily swings.

We all know from our non-weather friends that people will make crazy statements like "it was 45C at my friend's house in Kamloops yesterday." Clearly, non-weather people were just as crazy in the 1800s. Possibly moreso since thermometers were less common.

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Re: Fraser River - The main transportation hub

Postby Abby_wx » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:35 am

Glacier wrote:I would agree that winters were colder 120 years ago than they are today, but I've never found any evidence of 40 degree swings in the Lower Mainland. I can look at the historical data, and I swings of about 10C on a good day, just as you find today.

40F is 22C, and that has never happened. Looking at data from 1899 shows nothing out of the ordinary in terms of daily swings.

We all know from our non-weather friends that people will make crazy statements like "it was 45C at my friend's house in Kamloops yesterday." Clearly, non-weather people were just as crazy in the 1800s. Possibly moreso since thermometers were less common.


I see nothing like that in 1899, but the article also mentions 1922 (http://climate.weather.gc.ca/climate_da ... &Month=12#). December 1922 in fact had a notable cold wave followed by a period of very warm and wet weather. The temperature remained below freezing (reaching as low as 0F) for nearly two weeks before warming quickly. The temperature went from 6F on the 17th, to 47F on the 19th -- a 41 degree swing over two days. The temperature would reach as high as 55F in the week following, with over 270 mm of rain in the final two weeks of the month (that would cause some landslides for sure).

However, January 1950 was more extreme temperature-wise. Just glancing at Abbotsford, it went from -6F on the 18th to 48F on the 20th -- a 54 degree swing in two days (43F of that in a single day).

I don't know of any examples of a 40F drop in one day, but it's not something I've researched very closely. I believe it is possible with a strong enough arctic front.
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Abby_wx
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Re: Fraser River - The main transportation hub

Postby Abby_wx » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:02 am

There is certainly no doubt that long periods of sub-freezing weather were more common back then than they are today. Since the article also mentioned 1896, here's the data for Agassiz for November of that year: http://climate.weather.gc.ca/climate_da ... imeframe=2
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Glacier
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Re: Fraser River - The main transportation hub

Postby Glacier » Tue Dec 13, 2016 10:29 am

Abby_wx wrote:There is certainly no doubt that long periods of sub-freezing weather were more common back then than they are today. Since the article also mentioned 1896, here's the data for Agassiz for November of that year: http://climate.weather.gc.ca/climate_da ... imeframe=2

November 1896 is not that much different from November 1985. I mean, we're talking about 16 days in a row below 0 versus 14. Almost all of the warming has come in January, February, and July. When we look at November and December there has been no warming. eg.

YYJDecember.png


I agree though that we don't get the huge extremes like they did in the 1950s and 1930s. The 1930s were the craziest of all. Extreme cold in winter and extreme heat in summer.
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